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Veterinary radiology encompasses a variety of diagnostic imaging techniques, including the following five core areas: all aspects of Roentgen diagnosis; diagnostic ultrasound; computed tomography (CT); magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); and diagnostic nuclear medicine. Additional objectives include: integration of understanding of equine disease processes and sports and discipline related injuries/abnormalities with imaging analysis, promotion of research and development in the field of equine imaging by board-certified equine radiologists, promotion of the highest level of acquisition and interpretation of equine diagnostic imaging and provide high quality imaging support to equine practitioners and clients.

Successful completion of the residency will provide the trainee with opportunities to pursue a career in private practice, both within a clinic setting or as an independent consultant and/or to enter academia for clinical service, teaching and research of equine diagnostic imaging. The scope of the program will allow for residents to be able to integrate an understanding of equine disease processes and treatment of the disease with the imaging findings to incorporate as a valuable member of the equine veterinary team.

A standard program which meets all requirements in the Equine Diagnostic Imagine Residency Program Essentials is a minimum of 3 years of postdoctoral medical education. ACVR does not warrant that successful completion of an ACVR approved residency training program will lead to passage of the ACVR Radiology (Written & Oral) Board Certification Examination and/or achievement of ACVR Diplomate status.

Search for available radiology residency positions at the VIRMP under ‘Residency – Equine Diagnostic Imaging‘ or view advertisements in the AVMA Journal.

The standard Radiology Residency training programs listed below have been determined to meet all training requirements established by the ACVR. However, the ACVR does not warrant that successful completion of an ACVR approved residency training program will lead to passage of the ACVR Radiology Board Certification Examination and/or achievement of ACVR Diplomate status.

 

  • Director:
  • Program: 3 Years
  • Approval granted through:
  • Reapplication Due:
  • Program Description
  • Director: Dr. Mathieu Spriet and Dr. Amy Norvall
  • Program: 3 Years
  • Approval granted through:
  • Reapplication Due:
  • Program Description

Frequently Asked Questions: ACVR-EDI

The Equine Diagnostic Imaging specialty of the American College of Veterinary Radiology (ACVR-EDI)

The purpose of the EDI specialty of the ACVR is to provide more specialized diagnostic imaging service to equine practitioners and specialists; further raise the standard of care; and promote research, teaching, academic development, and clinical service to the equine industry.

  • During the developmental period, any member of the American College of Veterinary Radiology (ACVR) that obtained diplomate status on or before the year 2023, with an interest in equine diagnostic imaging, is qualified to take the EDI certifying examination.
  • After 2023, candidates must have met the minimum requirements of an approved ACVR-EDI specialty residency in order to take an ACVR-EDI specialty qualifying examination.  Following successful completion of the qualifying examination, candidates can take the ACVR-EDI certifying examination.  Candidates will achieve ACVR-EDI certification upon successful completion of the certifying examination.

Residency consists of a minimum 3-year training program including all available diagnostic imaging modalities, and encompassing orthopedic, soft tissue, abdominal, airway and cardiac imaging.  Residents should have integral involvement with equine clinicians in multiple fields to promote a clinically applicable and holistic approach to equine diagnostic imaging.  Full requirements of an ACVR residency program

Residencies are a minimum of three years.

See above

Approved Equine Diagnostic Imaging Residencies

Also, search for available radiology residency positions at the VIRMP under ‘Residency – Equine Diagnostic Imaging‘ or view advertisements in the AVMA Journal.

No. The EDI group is intended to provide more specialized diagnostic imaging services to equine practitioners and fulfill an already existing niche in diagnostic imaging.

The development of EDI has no effect on the requirements of the traditional ACVR-DI residency. Residents in a traditional ACVR program (Diagnostic Imaging) will still be required to demonstrate minimum competency in equine diagnostic imaging as defined by the ACVR residency standards.  The proportion of equine diagnostic imaging on the ACVR board objectives will not be affected by development of the EDI specialty.